MULTITASKER TWIST

MULTITASKER TWIST

February 26, 2016

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What is the one factor that can level your $600 gun show “Delton Special” against the highest end Knight’s Armament or LWRC systems on the market? Weapons maintenance. That super sexy LWRC piston stick is going to be nothing more than a Louisville Slugger if you don’t keep up with you standard preventive maintenance checks and service (PMCS) operations. Hosting a gun-cleaning party at your house after a long day at the range or in the TOC/Platoon Area after a mission is one thing, but having to be able to workover your rifle in the field… that is a completely different beast. This is where the Multitasker Twist changes the game.

For a standard maintenance kit almost every trigger-jockey will tell you that you need a well-stocked cleaning kit, a barrel wrench, a set of punches, etc. Which will allow you to strip your barrel down to nuts-and-bolts pieces and troubleshoot any issues that arise with it. While this is an important capability to have in the field, particularly in small-teams operations, the number of tools that it requires are bulky, heavy, and take up valuable real-estate in already crowded and weighty rucks.

While not a be-all-end-all solution to the standard maintenance kit on its own, the Twist is capable of cutting your tool kit in half while not sacrificing any field capabilities. Combined within the space of a chemlight you can store a carbon scraper, dental pick, punch, small pry bar, Aimpoint sight tool, AR iron-sight tool, bit driver and a set of 10 assorted bits (Flat, Phillips, Hex, and Torx) for the built-in magnetic driver.

Straight out of the box there isn’t much to explain about this little tool. You can twist one end off to reveal the dental pick, carbon scraper, and punch that you can remove and screw onto the adapter in the piece you just pulled loose. The directions say, quite explicitly, NOT to use the punch or scraper as pry bars, which isn’t a huge problem, since the “pocket clip” doubles as a large flathead/light-duty pry bar. Under that side of the tool is a magnetic driver that stores your AR iron-sight adjustment tool. The sight tool can be removed and any of the included 10 bits fit in the driver for ready use in the field. Once you screw the cap back on the exposed end has an Aimpoint sight tool built into it, handy for those running the Aimpoint system.

So while it’s not the “last AR tool you’ll ever need,” it is a start in the right direction. This piece, combined with a barrel snake quickly shrinks down that field kit while maintaining a respectable variety of function. The hardest part about this lil guy is finding it in stock, but if you can, at only $50 out the door it’s a great little supplement to have in a go-bag or on a battle belt where real estate comes at a high value.

Available via SKD

CJ Jordy

Jordy is a veteran of multiple combat tours in both Iraq and Afghanistan with the United States Army where he was privileged to work with a variety of highly trained people from multiple nations. As a soldier he wore many hats from Team Leader to Senior Trainer and beyond and carried the 19D, 11B, 11C, and 91W MOSs. After his discharge he decided to use his training to delve further into his understanding of unconventional warfare.

After receiving a Bachelor degree in History with minors in Middle Eastern Studies, World Religions, Philosophy, and Interfaith Studies he went on to complete his Masters at the University of Alabama (ROLL TIDE) in History, with a focus on Asymmetrical Warfare and its tactics and applications. Outside of academia Jordy takes the Rogue motto very seriously, and constantly strives to train and grow his understanding of not only warfare and its various skill sets, but what makes warriors tick.



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